11/7 Gen-I NOW: 2019 Champions for Change Application Extended

The Champions for Change (CFC) program recognizes Native American youth leaders who are making a positive impact on their communities. We select five young people from throughout the United States to share their stories on a national platform, receive tailored leadership and development opportunities from our team, and grow their advocacy initiatives with our support. Deadline to apply and nominate has been extended! 

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10/10 Gen-I NOW: Native American Political Leadership Program (NAPLP)

George Washington University’s Native American Political Leadership Program (NAPLP) is a full scholarship for Native American, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian students who want to study in Washington, DC for a semester It is open to undergraduate and graduate students, including students who have finished their undergraduate degree, but have not yet enrolled in a graduate program. NAPLP students will work with the Center for Indigenous Politics & Policy (CIPP) to find and internship opportunity that fits with students’ professional goals. The NAPLP scholarship covers: tuition and fees for the 2 core classes (up to 9 credit hours total), housing in a GW dormitory, a stipend for books and living expenses (paid in 2 installments), and airfare to and from Washington, D.C. (one round-trip ticket). Applications are due November 1, 2018 for the Spring 2019 Semester.  

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9/19 Gen-I NOW: Become a Champion for Change

Champions for Change recognizes Native American youth leaders who are making a positive impact in their communities. We select five Native youth from throughout the United States to share their stories on a national platform, receive tailored leadership and development opportunities, and grow their advocacy initiatives with our support. Champions receive an all-expense-paid trip to Washington, DC, where they network with high-level decision-makers, meet their congressional representatives, and get trained on how to best amplify their advocacy work.  

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