Mikah Carlos on her Journey to Reconnect with Culture and Lead in Her Community

Mikah Carlos is a member of the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community and is 24 years old. Mikah first learned of the 2017 Gen-I Survey through social media. She decided to take the survey because she recognized the importance of having tangible, first person narratives and data directly from Native youth.  

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Native American Youth: Our Identities as Civic Power

At a time when national dialogues about identity are more divisive than ever, Native youth are using the strength of their cultures to come together, reach out to others, and mobilize toward meaningful community change. Throughout history, Native peoples have been the targets of U.S. policies designed to strip them of the very cultural strengths that ensured their survival. Today’s Native youth are drawing on that same resilience to battle staggering disparities in health, education, economic opportunity, and more. We see examples of this resilience in youth leaders and youth councils throughout the country who use connections to land, relationships with elders, and ancestral teachings to strengthen the lessons of the past and inspire their peers to build strong futures for tribal communities.
 

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CNAY Seeks Program Manager

The Center for Native American Youth seeks an entrepreneurial, well-organized, and driven Program Manager to oversee and grow our youth engagement strategy, evaluation measures, and program budget. This team member will manage the Champions for Change Native youth leadership program, lead CNAY’s Technical Assistance project to promote local youth recognition efforts, and be significantly responsible for direct interaction and communication with American Indian and Alaska Native youth, tribal leaders, and other key stakeholders.  

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11/1 Gen-I NOW: Scientific Conference Opportunity for Native Students

This Gen-I Native Opportunities Weekly (NOW) messages shares information about the Scientific Conference Opportunities Program, hosted by the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology (SICB).

SICB, the National Science Foundation, Oklahoma State University CHS Office for the Advancement of American Indians in Medicine and Science, Case Western Reserve University, and Mount Holyoke College have partnered together to provide this opportunity to American Indian undergraduates interested in STEM to participate in the SCIB annual meeting.

American Indian undergraduates will have the opportunity to participate in a nationally acclaimed scientific meeting and a special symposium on the role of sensory feedback during animal locomotion. Participants will also be partnered with a graduate student mentor and provided with career guidance and scientific opportunities. This all expenses-paid program will take place in San Francisco, CA on January 3-7.

Applications are due November 30 at Midnight, Eastern Time. Click HERE to apply.

To Apply:

Questions? Click here for more information or email braiello@uchicago.edu.

 

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